The Bride Of Christ – Jessica Hartzold

Thursday, October 14th, 2021
Apostolic Pentecostal Church
The Bride Of Christ – Jessica Hartzold







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Joseph (OT) – Jay Howard

Thursday, October 14th, 2021
Apostolic Pentecostal Church
Joseph (OT) – Jay Howard







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Daniel Chapter 2 – Jill Melder

Thursday, October 14th, 2021
Apostolic Pentecostal Church
Daniel Chapter 2 – Jill Melder







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Daniel Chapter 1 – Avery Wilson

Thursday, October 7th, 2021
Apostolic Pentecostal Church
Daniel Chapter 1 – Avery Wilson







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Biblical Baptism – Bruce Melder

Thursday, October 7th, 2021
Apostolic Pentecostal Church
Biblical Baptism – Bruce Melder







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Apostle Peter – Jessica Hartzold

Thursday, October 7th, 2021
Apostolic Pentecostal Church
Apostle Peter – Jessica Hartzold







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Hebrews: Session 08

Tuesday, December 22nd, 2020
Apostolic Pentecostal Church
Hebrews: Session 08







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Hebrews: Session 07

Tuesday, December 22nd, 2020
Apostolic Pentecostal Church
Hebrews: Session 07







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Hebrews: Session 05

Thursday, December 3rd, 2020
Apostolic Pentecostal Church
Hebrews: Session 05







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Sis. Melder teaches in this fifth lesson in our iGrow Hebrews track!

Hebrews: Session 04

Monday, November 23rd, 2020
Apostolic Pentecostal Church
Hebrews: Session 04







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Bro. Bruce Melder covers chapter four of Hebrews in our iGrow 2020 series on Hebrews.

Discovering My Mission

Saturday, November 14th, 2020
Apostolic Pentecostal Church
Discovering My Mission







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Pastor Josh Linton teaches us about discovering our mission and purpose in serving Christ.

Hebrews: Session 03

Thursday, November 12th, 2020
Apostolic Pentecostal Church
Hebrews: Session 03







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Join Sis. Melder as she teaches on Hebrews chapter 3 and Christ being shown to be a more worthy High Priest than Moses.

Christian Living: Separated from the World

Thursday, November 12th, 2020
Apostolic Pentecostal Church
Christian Living: Separated from the World







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Our iGrow series in the Christian Living track with a lesson taught by Pastor Nave on what it means to be Separated from the World and Christ’s desire for the Church to be so.

Christian Living: Temple of God

Wednesday, November 11th, 2020
Apostolic Pentecostal Church
Christian Living: Temple of God







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Listen in on Sis. Jessica Hartzold’s lesson on Christian Living & the Temple of God

iGrow – Hebrews Session 02

Wednesday, November 11th, 2020
Apostolic Pentecostal Church
iGrow – Hebrews Session 02







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Join Sis. Jill Melder as she dives into the book of Hebrews in this study sure to strengthen your walk with Christ.

iGrow 2020 – King Me: Saul

Sunday, November 1st, 2020
Apostolic Pentecostal Church
iGrow 2020 – King Me: Saul







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Sis. Jessica Hartzold leads us through the life of King Saul and how we can apply it to our own lives.

iGrow 2020 – Hebrews Session 01

Saturday, October 31st, 2020
Apostolic Pentecostal Church
iGrow 2020 – Hebrews Session 01







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Part of our ongoing iGrow Series – this is the first session of twelve lessons on the book of Hebrews. Join Bro. & Sis. Melder as they bring their wisdom and insight with the help of the Holy Spirit into this fantastic book, and how we can apply it to our lives today.

The Gospel of John: Part II

Thursday, September 15th, 2016
Apostolic Pentecostal Church
The Gospel of John: Part II







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As we continue on in our journey of the book of John, we see John doesn’t provide accounts of Jesus in chronological order, but depicts snapshots of His life. His accounts leave us to put the pieces together and to draw out the meaning behind them.

Jesus’ First Miracle

John describes Jesus’ first miracle in John 2:1–11, Jesus turning water into wine. This miracle is different than any other miracle Jesus would ever perform in His ministry. Most miracles—demonstrating God’s power—renewed parts of fallen creation: blindness, lameness, etc. But, no one was dying, sick, or in danger in this particular setting. It was just a wedding, and they were in need of wine.

Culturally, wedding celebrations were several days (or a week) long, and the host would provide for his guests per the law of hospitality. It was considered a great shame and dishonor to run out of anything. It was a large concern (of embarrassment mostly) that they would run out of wine.

Jesus used the 6 stone jars of water typically used for ceremonial washing for His miracle. This was water people would use to “cleanse” themselves just walking through the streets. The stone water pots weren’t a place to store any liquid one would consume—it was unclean. But, this didn’t matter to Jesus—He used it anyway.

Through this miracle, Jesus showed He will use whatever He wants to do His will. Jesus revealed how He would enact His ministry on earth—through interaction with people; fulfilling the needs of those around Him. And, it was from this miracle, His disciples believed and determined to follow Him.

Jesus’ Intolerance for Fake Worship

John describes an account when Jesus enters the Temple during the Passover celebration, and chases out the moneychangers and all who bought and sold in the Temple (John 2:13–17). The Passover was the largest, annual celebration of the Jewish people, which lasted 1 week long. It was necessary on the Passover day for all men (over the age of 19) to go to the Temple with a sacrifice and worship the Lord.

During this celebration, the Jews would remove all leaven from their homes symbolizing removal of sin—a type of spiritual cleansing. Jesus realized it wasn’t just the homes that needed to be cleaned up, but also the church and the church system.

Jews had set up booths in the outer court of the Gentiles to convert money for people to pay the temple tax as well as to purchase a sacrifice. The Gentiles couldn’t worship effectively in this outer court because it was so full of merchants. People had become too distracted by greed—selling sacrifices for a very high price—and forgot why they were at the house of God.

Man had turned praise into a profit—manipulating the visit to the Temple as a benefit for them instead of doing something for God. Jesus doesn’t like it when we turn church into something that’s all about us, and when we get lazy with our worship.

We should realize we serve a God who is worthy of all or our sacrifice and praise. He’s given us an opportunity and privilege to come into His presence and worship Him. Our worship every day is about the King of kings and Lord of lords. Because of everything He’s done for us, our worship should cost us something! King David understood that He couldn’t offer anything to God that he didn’t work for (II Samuel 24:24). Our worship should expend us physically, emotionally, mentally, and spiritually.

Instead of reaching out to the Gentiles to know the true God, the Jews were more concerned with filling up this the outer court with “fake” stuff. They weren’t letting their light shine because they had lost their fever for worship and service to God. But, Jesus has a zeal for the house of God (Psalms 69:9)—He got upset when people were misusing it.

Today, we should contemplate if church is routine or real for us. Our experience with God should be a supernatural interaction—not just an event or a moment in time. We should seek out God in His sanctuary (Psalm 77:13) and desire to dwell with Him all the days of our life (Psalms 27:4).

When we have zeal in worshipping and serving the Lord, God notices and reacts. When He finds a willing vessel, He will pour more anointing into us than we could ever imagine. Our passion and willingness to serve God will impact others, and we—as Jesus did—will draw followers. We will teach people to love and serve God.

Adapted from Wednesday Night Bible Study on September 15, 2016

A Lame Excuse for a Bible Study

Thursday, August 18th, 2016
Apostolic Pentecostal Church
A Lame Excuse for a Bible Study







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Now Peter and John went up together into the temple at the hour of prayer, being the ninth hour. And a certain man lame from his mother’s womb was carried, whom they laid daily at the gate of the temple which is called Beautiful, to ask alms of them that entered into the temple; Who seeing Peter and John about to go into the temple asked an alms. And Peter, fastening his eyes upon him with John, said, Look on us. And he gave heed unto them, expecting to receive something of them. Then Peter said, Silver and gold have I none; but such as I have give I thee: In the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth rise up and walk. And he took him by the right hand, and lifted him up: and immediately his feet and ankle bones received strength. And he leaping up stood, and walked, and entered with them into the temple, walking, and leaping, and praising God. And all the people saw him walking and praising God: And they knew that it was he which sat for alms at the Beautiful gate of the temple: and they were filled with wonder and amazement at that which had happened unto him. And as the lame man which was healed held Peter and John, all the people ran together unto them in the porch that is called Solomon’s, greatly wondering (Acts 3:1–11, KJV).

The story of the lame man is a familiar one in Scripture—familiar to us today and familiar to the people during this time in history. We know about this man who laid daily at the gate of the temple, who received a miracle in his life one day. However, beyond the miracle, there are four key elements we can learn from this story.

An Unknown Change

When the lame man arose that morning, he didn’t know what laid in store for him that day. He had the same expectation as every other day—going to lay at the gate of the temple, unchanged. We should be different from the lame man and change our way of thinking that every day will be the same as before. We need to have a spirit of expectation that God will do something in our life; that He will meet a need! God is a very present help in a time of trouble (Psalms 46:1). If God’s power transformed this man’s life at the temple gate, the same good work can happen in our lives today (Philippians 1:6).

God Can Do Anything Through Anybody

It doesn’t matter who we are—God can do a work through us. God is no respecter of persons (Romans 2:11)! He used Jonah to lead the city of Nineveh to repentance, Moses to lead the Nation of Israel out of Egyptian bondage, and so much more through others throughout Scripture. All He needs is a willing vessel and an obedient heart. We are more than conquers to overcome any situation (Romans 8:37) and we can do all things through Christ who strengthens us (Philippians 4:13).

Having Faith to Pray

Trusting in God requires an activation of our faith—to believe and to speak things that are not as though they are (Romans 4:17). We don’t always need to have the end result to have the faith to pray about it! Peter stepped forward and lifted the man up from his resting place before he received confirmation that he was healed. All we need is the faith of a grain of mustard seed, and we can see any mountain removed from our life (Matthew 17:20).

People Will Talk

We cannot allow the opinions and negative attitudes of others around us to dictate how we live and view what God is doing in our lives. God’s ways and thoughts are always higher than our own (Isaiah 55:9); we need to eliminate distractions out of our life that will keep us from understanding and following God’s will. We need to have a passion to live for God, to trust Him, and to do what He speaks into our life regardless of what others around us day and do. If we stay connected to Him, and allow His Spirit to move in us, His Spirit will quicken us (Romans 8:11) to do a good work. If we believe, signs and wonders are sure to follow (Mark 16:17–18).

Adapted from Wednesday Night Bible Study on August 17, 2016 with Guest Speaker Brother Casey Pollard

Can I Get Some Service Please: Part II

Thursday, August 11th, 2016
Apostolic Pentecostal Church
Can I Get Some Service Please: Part II







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Who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal with God: But made himself of no reputation, and took upon him the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness of men: And being found in fashion as a man, he humbled himself, and became obedient unto death, even the death of the cross (Philippians 2:6–8, KJV).

Last week, we learned how Jesus had the power to become more than what He was, but instead He chose to become less—He became a servant. If we are to be a servant in God’s kingdom we need to follow Jesus’ example, have the right motives, and allow servanthood to be a part of our everyday walk with the Lord.

Two Ways to Serve in God’s Kingdom

There are two ways to serve in God’s kingdom: 1) exercise our gifts and 2) filling gaps. Working for God may be in using our talents, abilities, and passions, but it also may be about filling in the gaps because work just needs to be done!

Exercise Our Gifts

God has placed abilities in each of our lives to fulfill a work in His kingdom. These abilities can come in the form of Spiritual Gifts, and other ways the Lord chooses to gift us. Once we identify our gifts, there are three places God wants us to use our gifts.

Three Places God Wants Us to Use Our Gifts

God wants everyone to use their gifts in an ongoing ministry. This is a ministry we have in the church that we work in on a regular basis. But, there is other work to be done within the church, so we should use our gifts to help with short-term projects. We might find ourselves lending our hand to VBS, Food Bank, or other areas we don’t normally spend a majority of our time. Lastly, we need to help in spontaneous situations. Our giftings come to help us help with the day-by-day work, making our ministry a lifestyle we live instead of a role to play, or a position to fill.

Spiritual Gifts

Understanding how we are gifted will help us become more effective in God’s kingdom. If we don’t understand our giftings, we can get frustrated with working in a ministry where we’re not gifted. Everyone will always have a primary place to serve and a secondary place to serve. The secondary places we serve are ways we help fill gaps in the church with our giftings.

Ministry is determined by several factors (I Corinthians 12:4–7), but God has put something in each of us to benefit His kingdom. We should exercise the SHAPE of our ministry.

SHAPE

S—Spiritual Gifts

Spiritual Gifts are not natural talents, or something we develop. But, God will develop certain gifts in us through the Holy Spirit inside of us—it’s supernatural workings in our life! Everyone is blessed with a particular Spiritual Gift that God has ordained (I Corinthians 12:7), and we might operate in one or more of the Spiritual Gifts listed in Scripture.

H—Heart

We have gifts in our life that are tied to passions God has instilled in our hearts. We can determine what we love to do or have a passion to do, and fulfill that ministry in God’s kingdom (Revelation 17:17). We could have a burden for orphans, young children, missions, etc. God will help us find ways to work in a ministry that helps us express this passion.

A—Abilities

God has also blessed each of us with the ability to do something. God can anoint us with the wisdom and/or skill to be able to do something in His kingdom that no one else knows how to do (Exodus 31:5–5). Our abilities can also be vocational skills that we can use to help the kingdom.

P—Personality

Our personality will map over into the different places of service in God’s kingdom. An introvert will not be outgoing and may not be best suited for a ministry in church greeting or a ministry that’s in the public eye of the church. But, God knows our spirit (I Corinthians 2:11) and will help us find the best fit in ministry that matches our temperament.

E—Experiences

We should examine our experiences and see how we’ve been shaped for ministry. We should look at our spiritual experiences. If we’re a babe in Christ, we may not be ready to work in a Sunday School ministry (Hebrews 5:12–14), but if we’re more seasoned, we can teach others God’s Word. We should look at our painful experiences. The trials and tribulations we’ve experienced in life will help us help others (II Corinthians 1:4). We should look at our educational experiences and hold fast to what we’ve learned (Proverbs 4:13). Lastly, we should look at overall ministry experiences. The roles we’ve played, placed we’ve worked, and jobs we’ve had in the church will help us. What we’re doing now for God’s kingdom may be shaping us for a ministry in the future.

God uses all of these factors to SHAPE us to serve. Our SHAPE will help us exercise our gifts but also to fill gaps in God’s kingdom. We must remember that service is not always about finding a way to always work in our giftings—we must also fill gaps. If God reveals a work to us, it’s most likely because God has given us the ability to meet it. Let Christ’s mind be in us today (Philippians 2:5). Let’s follow after His footsteps and serve!

Adapted from Wednesday Night Bible Study on August 10, 2016