Transplanted

by Joanna Pierce on August 29, 2018

I’ve been created with a unique talent most people don’t have in this life. It has taken years to cultivate, although garnered with little-to-no practice, and I’ve excelled to levels that are unprecedented in this world. This gift even comes with its own great title—Plant Killer.

I’m a bonified plant killer. My main issue is that I forget to water plants, or over water plants (how dumb is that?). Sometimes, I let a plant get too large for its pot and then it becomes root-bound…

Once I had a heart for a particular plant, and valiantly tried this transplant thing—the calculated project of moving a plant from one pot to another. But, the environment wasn’t right (big surprise) and I shocked the plant too badly. It died shortly thereafter.

My career in transplants was short-lived, but God’s been in the business for a long time.

But she was plucked up in fury, she was cast down to the ground, and the east wind dried up her fruit: her strong rods were broken and withered; the fire consumed them. And now she is planted in the wilderness, in a dry and thirsty ground (Ezekiel 19:12–13, KJV).

The Nation of Israel had continued to be disobedient to God, were wicked in their hearts, and disregarded His law. So, God plucked them up out of their land and burned their city and temple with fire. Then, in the words of the New Living Translation, transplanted them into Babylonian captivity for 70 years.

After their transplant, they couldn’t flourish because it wasn’t the right environment: it was captivity. Like my poor plant, the abrupt transition of ripping them out of their homes never welcomed adjustment and growth in a new land.

Later, God performed another transplant when he grafted in the Gentiles (Romans 11:17–21). God opened the doors, with the death of Jesus Christ, for all nations and people to receive the blessings promised to Abraham and His children. God broke off some of the branches of unbelievers (in the Jews) to make room for the Gentiles.

God has promises for His people—His chosen Nation of Israel, and all Gentile nations. But, if we’re not careful, lose faith, follow after other gods, fail to abide in His Word, etc., He’ll pluck us up and/or pluck us off.

Transplanting is easy for God and He can move us into a place of plenty or a place of puny. But, remember He’s a Transplanter, not a plant-killer. He transplants because of His love and mercy toward us.

When we’re transplanted in any environment, there’s still hope for us. God didn’t kill Israel in the Old Testament. He made them live in less-than-desirable circumstances for a while so they could shape up. After 70 years, He released them and gave them strength and favor to rebuild the city. This was another transplant in Israel’s history: back home, back to good soil, and back in God’s favor.

If you’ve been transplanted recently, remember there’s hope for you today. Transplants are not final (which can be good or bad), but God has a will to bless and prosper you. Pray that God can help you transition to be a part of His vine, with your roots firmly planted in good soil. And, once you’ve found that good land, pray that He helps you stay there until He’s ready to transplant you on heaven’s shore.